The Trauco
The “Trauco” is a character deeply rooted in the collective unconscious of the inhabitants of the Chiloé archipelago, at the southern part of Chile. The legend says this character lives in the woods and he mainly eats fruits, roots and trunks of rotten trees. He has the appearance of a gnome and he has great physical strength and a fierce stare. His garments are made of crust of native tree’s fibres. He always carries an axe made of stone and he uses a cap similar to the ones used by the gnomes of the european fairy tales. It is said the Trauco is an evil entity. A satyr that likes young virgins females. They feel an irresistible attraction to him, and the result is the birth of babies. So, when a single girl becomes pregnant, it is common to hear stories where the one to blame is the Trauco.
If somebody dreams with the Trauco there is the belief that this person will suffer 25 illnesses in a row. Women could be possessed by this spirit in a type of libidinous dream leaving utterly exhausted to his victims.
Oral Tradition. (Excerpt from the book “The True American Dream”, by Rosa Anwandter. Centro de Estudios Oníricos de Chile, CEO-Chile, Santiago, Chile. February, 2001).

Myth of the Iguazú Falls
An ethnic group called “guaraní” inhabits in a big extension of the brazilian territory, north of Argentina and all over Paraguay. In the confluence of all these countries are located the Iguazú Falls. It is a set of many waterfalls of approximately 80 meters height and with an extension of more than three kilometres.
This spectacular view of nature always astounded the local people, and since the arrival of the european conquerors there are testimonies about many myths and legends.
There is a guaraní legend about a beautiful young girl called Naipú, who lived with her parents at the riverside. A god saw her and hopelessly fell in love with her. However, Naipú fell for a simple and mortal man and ran away with her lover aboard a very fragile boat. The enraged god full of jealousy, created the Iguazú Falls, to hinder the lovers to continue being together.
Oral Tradition. (Excerpt from the book “The True American Dream”, by Rosa Anwandter. Centro de Estudios Oníricos de Chile, CEO-Chile, Santiago, Chile. February, 2001).
>>Up